Mary Cloud B. Ammons

Assistant Research Professor, Montana State University
  • Montana State University
  • Contributors
  • United States of America
Richa Dandona

Partnerships and Operations Manager, Nature Partner Journals, Nature Research

David Nathan Quan

Post-Doctoral Researcher, UMD

Elisabeth M. Bik

Science Editor, uBiome

After receiving my PhD at Utrecht University in The Netherlands, I worked at the Dutch National Institute for Health and the St. Antonius Hospital in Nieuwegein. From 2001-2016 I worked in the laboratory of David Relman at Stanford University, where I have worked on the characterization of human oral, gastric, and intestinal microbiotas, and that of marine mammals. In 2016 I joined uBiome where we allow citizen scientists to sequence their microbiome. I also run Microbiome Digest, www.microbiomedigest.com, an almost daily compilation of scientific papers in the rapidly growing microbiome field, tweet on Twitter as @MicrobiomDigest, and scan published papers for image manipulation.
Philip S. Stewart

Professor, Center for Biofilm Engineering

Ehud Banin

Associate Professor , Bar-Ilan University

Dr. Ehud Banin, a returning scientist from the University of Washington, Seattle, is a Member of the Nano Cleantech Center at the Institute of Nanotechnology and Advanced Materials (BINA), and lecturer at the Mina and Everard Goodman Faculty of Life Sciences. Banin has shown how bacteria under attack by the immune system create biofilms, surface-associated bacterial communities encased in an extracellular polymeric matrix. By revealing the specific pattern of gene expression that allows harmful bacteria to band together and survive in biofilms, Banin is defining an important target in the ongoing fight against antibiotic resistance, as well as for the search for new treatments for biofilm-related diseases such as cystic fibrosis. His laboratory implements an array of physiological, biochemical, and genetic tools combined with novel technologies that allow controlled and reproducible biofilm growth to characterize bacterial biofilms and compare them to the non-biofilm communities.
Thomas Jeffries

Research Associate (Environmental Microbiology), University of Western Sydney

@Thomas_Jeffries Dr Thomas Jeffries is a Microbial Ecologist with a wide range of expertise in molecular microbiology, bioinformatics and microbial biogeography. He obtained his PhD. in 2012 from Flinders University (Adelaide Australia). During his doctoral work he used metagenomics to investigate shifts in microbial community gene abundance in response to salinity and nutrient gradients within a hypersaline lagoon (the Coorong, Australia). His work demonstrated the influence of environmental variables on the abundance of salinity tolerance and photosynthesis pathways in bacterial genomes on local scales. On global scales he demonstrated that bacterial genome content is broadly determined by the physical substrate type of the habitat. His postdoctoral research has focused on marine microbial biogeography, the microbiome of Sydney Harbour, The distribution of marine fungal diversity and the role of microscale interactions in structuring microbial communities. Dr. Jeffries is also a contributor to the INDIGOV expedition utilizing citizen oceanography to investigate marine microbiomes on global scales. Dr Jeffries has extensive experience in using bioinformatics and ecogenomic tools to understand the diversity and function of microbiomes. He also is experienced in using multivariate statistics and network analysis to visualise highly complex data sets. He regularly runs tutorial workshops on various software packages. He is a steering committee member and chair of the Joint Academic Microbiology Seminar Series (JAMS) and is on the local organising committee for the Australian Society for Microbiology. Dr. Jeffries joined the Hawkesbury Institute for the Environment in 2014. His current work will focus on a CRC-CARE funded project to apply next-generation 'omics' tools and a systems-biology approach to understand the microbial bioremediation of organophosphorus and aromatic hydrocarbon contaminants, which pose a major global and local threat to human and environmental health. This work will deliver a predictive framework directly applicable to practitioners to aid the decision-making process and increase the efficiency of remediating contaminated sites
Marvin Whiteley

Professor, University of Texas at Austin

Tom Van de Wiele

Professor, Ghent University

Ute Römling

Professor, Karolinska Institutet

I studied Biochemistry at the Technical University of Hannover, Germany graduating with a MSc in Biochemistry in 1989. Subsequently, I obtained my PhD at the same university in 1993. After five years of postdoctoral research at the Medical School of Hannover and the Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, I was appointed Junior Research Group Leader at the Helmholtz Institute for Infection Research, Braunschweig, Germany in 1998. In 2002, I gained a position as an Associate Professor in Molecular Microbiology at the KI obtaining a 5 year ‘Elitforskartjänst’. In 2012, I obtained the position as a Professor in Medical Microbial Physiology at Karolinska Institutet. The major focus of my research is on regulation of biofilm formation in microorganisms, biofilm composition and interaction of biofilms in different environments. I am interested in basic research as well as the clinical and environmental aspects. In addition, we are interested in persistence mechanisms of world-wide spread of Pseudomonas aeruginosa clone C. In total, I have published 100 papers of original work, 28 reviews and 13 book contributions. I am engaged in education, organization of conferences and serve the scientific community also with a variety of several other activities.
Lutgarde Raskin

Altarum/ERIM Russell O'Neal Professor of Engineering, University of Michigan

Jens Nielsen

Professor, Chalmers University of Technology

Jens Nielsen has an MSc degree in Chemical Engineering and a PhD degree (1989) in Biochemical Engineering from the Danish Technical University (DTU), and after that established his independent research group and was appointed full Professor there in 1998. In 2008 he was recruited as Professor and Director to Chalmers University of Technology, Sweden, where he is currently directing a research group of more than 50 people and the Life Science Area of Advance, which coordinates over 200 researchers from 5 departments. Jens Nielsen has published so far more than 450 research papers that have been cited more than 15,000 times (current H-factor 60), co-authored more than 40 books and he is inventor of more than 50 patents. He has founded several companies that have raised more than 25 million € in venture capital. He has received numerous Danish and international awards and is member of the National Academy of Engineering in USA, the Royal Swedish Academy of Science, the Royal Danish Academy of Science and Letters, the Royal Swedish Academy of Engineering Sciences, the American Academy of Microbiology, Academy of Technical Sciences in Denmark, the Royal Society of Arts and Sciences in Gothenburg and the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering. He is a founding president of the International Metabolic Engineering Society.
Hans-Curt Flemming

Professor Emeritus, University of Duisburg-Essen

Chris Tobin Kahrstrom

Senior Editor, Nature

Scott A Rice

Associate Professor, Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering

A/Prof. Rice’s research programme is centered on how and why bacteria form matrix encased biofilms. The goal of such research is to define the molecular pathways that control the biofilm life-cycle, with a particular interest in those processes that regulate the switch between planktonic and biofilm growth. Such knowledge can be used to manipulate the biofilm in a directed fashion to either encourage or discourage biofilm formation as needed. His group works on a variety of biofilm systems, ranging from single species populations to increasingly more complex multispecies systems, which are more representative of natural biofilms. Current projects include the continued development and investigation of a simple three species biofilm consortia, focusing on the mechanisms and consequences of microbial interactions. He is also keenly interested in how bacteriophage may contribute to the development of biofilms, as opposed to their role as killing agents. Predation is a primary environmental factor responsible for the killing of bacteria and A/Prof. Rice is investigating how bacteria respond to predators. Another aspect of his research focuses on the application of nitric oxide, a bacterial signal, to control biofilm formation for medical and industrial applications.
Stefan Wuertz

Research Director, Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering

Prof. Stefan Wuertz's research focuses on the structure and function of microbial communities in engineered treatment systems and the molecular detection of pathogens in the environment. He is establishing scale-up engineering bioprocess systems and investigating environmental solutions to create novel and multi-scale interactive engineering platforms for multiple purposes, such as the recovery of nutrients from used water by biofilm processes.
Federico Lauro

Associate Professor, Nanyang Technological University

A/Prof. Lauro has pioneered skills in both experimental and computational sciences – in particular deep-sea microbiology and the latest 'omic' technologies. In total, he has authored 51 peer-reviewed publications in high impact journals, including Science and PNAS. In 2009, he described a mathematical model, which could predict the trophic strategy of marine bacteria from its genome sequence. This approach was widely acclaimed, and was the start of his integrative multidisciplinary venture – combining (meta) genomics, bioinformatics, physics and chemistry for the study of microbes in the global biogeochemical cycles. In 2011, Lauro described the microbial ecosystem of an entire Antarctic lake using a systems biology approach, shifting the conventional ecological paradigm away from microbial populations to whole microbial communities. Lauro’s research and his innovative ideas continue to put him at the forefront of his field. In a 2014 publication (Lauro et al. 2014), Federico addresses the lack of data coverage and sampling across oceanic waters, a prevalent issue that has always left the scientific community with incomplete information to make concrete deductions and predictions on ocean weather, currents, climatic patterns, trajectories of missing objects and the like. Currently, there is little information to allow even for an estimate of the physical, biological and chemical characteristics of the world’s waters. Lauro’s open call for the crowdsourcing of oceanographic data has garnered much attention and will hopefully lay the foundation for yet another pioneering success. Along with his pursuit of marine microbial environments, Lauro is extending his expertise and highly renowned set of skills to that of the air microbiome.
Diane McDougald

Associate Professor, Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering

Asst. Prof. McDougald has made significant contributions to the fields of Vibrio biology, bacterial adaptation to stress and mechanisms of molecular control of these responses, cell-to-cell communication, biofilm formation and interactions of bacteria with higher eukaryotes. Her group’s major research interest is on the investigation of mechanisms of survival and persistence of pathogens in the environment, and what impact these mechanisms have on virulence and pathogenicity in the host. They investigate the evolutionary drivers and consequences of bacterial adaptation to stresses, including interactions with higher organisms. Broadly, they study the interactions of prokaryotes and eukaryotes using a number of model systems to investigate the impact of predation by protozoa on microbial communities and how evolution of grazing defences drives the evolution of pathogenicity in the environment. Predation is an important selection pressure that pathogens face in the environment, and as a result, pathogens may evolve phenotypes that not only increase their fitness in the environment, but may also increase their fitness in the human host. This research platform will allow her group to test key aspects of the Coincidental Selection Hypothesis, which states that the virulence of many opportunistic human pathogens may be an accidental by-product of selection for adaptations not related to human disease.
Yehuda Cohen

Professor, Singapore Centre for Environmental Life Sciences Engineering

Prof. Yehuda Cohen's research interests are in molecular microbial ecology, with emphasis on the structure and function of complex microbial communities as affected by their interactions with the environment. His research has also focused on the physiological plasticity of cyanobacteria that enables them to shift from oxygenic photosynthesis to anoxygenic photosynthesis and the ability of anaerobic bacteria to remain active when exposed to oxygen.
Staffan Jan Normark

Senior Professor, Karolinska Institutet

Senior Professor of Medical Microbiology at Karolinska Institutet. Performing pioneering work on genetic engineering, molecular biology, and microbial pathogenesis, since the 1970s. Permanent Secretary of the Royal Swedish Academy of Sciences since July 2010.
Magdalena Skipper

Editor in Chief, Nature, Nature Research, Springer Nature

I am a geneticist by training. Having done research using classical genetics and molecular biology in a variety of model organisms I left the bench to become an editor, first for Nature Reviews Genetics and then Nature. I have worked with the research community as an editor, in a variety of roles, for over 17 years