Editorial Summary: Dentistry: Composition of human oral bacteria changes with time

A novel technique allows direct monitoring of time-dependent changes in the communities of bacteria that inhabit the human mouth.

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Aug 10, 2016
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A novel technique allows direct monitoring of time-dependent changes in the communities of bacteria that inhabit the human mouth. Headed by Nanako Wake and Yoko Asahi of Osaka University Graduate School of Dentistry, a team in Japan inserted acrylic splints into the mouths of healthy volunteers. The nature of bacterial growth on the splints was then subjected to regular quantitative analysis and comprehensive identification over a 4-day period. The authors found that the initial population of facultative anaerobic bacteria (which can respire both with and without oxygen) became replaced by one of obligate anaerobic bacteria (which die in the presence of oxygen). The results of this study shed light on our understanding of the dynamics of human oral bacterial populations and the origins of caries and gum disease.

Taken from the Open Access article:Temporal dynamics of bacterial microbiota in the human oral cavity determined using an in situ model of dental biofilms

Go to the profile of Jeanette Romero

Jeanette Romero

Communities and Digital Engagement Marketing Executive, Nature Research

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