Press Coverage for Biofilms and Microbiomes Article

A recent paper that was promoted in the community and published in Biofilms and Microbiomes has been written up in IFL Science

Go to the profile of Ben Libberton
Dec 12, 2015
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Hello community!

Recently Sharon Longford from the SCELSE promoted an article in the community with a really well written press release. This has now been published in IFLscience which is great for several reasons, and could benefit all of us in the future.

Firstly, as scientists, we have to demonstrate outreach and publicity in one of the biggest independent science blogs in the world is a great way to do that. Sharon, the authors, the SCELSE and Nature Biofilms and Microbiomes will rightly be able to brag. They will be able to say to potential funders, students and employers that their research captured the imagination of the public.

Secondly, as Nature Biofilms and Microbiomes becomes established, publicity like this will help put the journal in the front of the scientific community as a place that publishers exciting and cutting edge research.

As a community, we can all capitalise on this. We should share this article on social media accounts and go over to the page and leave comments. Why? Because, this is a very clear signal to the press outlets that biofilms and microbiomes matter. It is a way of signalling that there is a large community of research who are doing exciting science that is capable of engaging the public thought. If we can do this at the beginning, it will be much easier to get more press coverage in the future.

I love talking about this and would be happy to discuss it. For now though, lets share this article and leave some comments!

http://www.iflscience.com/technology/new-hybrid-fu...



Go to the profile of Ben Libberton

Ben Libberton

Communications Officer, MAX IV Laboratory

I'm a Communications Officer at MAX IV Laboratory in Lund, Sweden, formally a Postdoc in the biofilm field. I'm interested in how bacteria cause disease and look to technology to produce novel tools to study and ultimately prevent infection. Part of my current role is to find ways to use synchrotron radiation to study microorganisms.

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